x-height

Generally, the height of the lowercase letters of a specific typeface, excluding extenders. Traditionally, it is derived from the height of the lowercase x of the typeface, as the lowercase x nearly always sits squarely on the baseline (many lowercase letters actually extend a very slight bit below the baseline, even without extenders). X-height can vary considerably among typefaces with the same point size. Typeface with large x-height tends to look bigger and be more legible. If x-height gets too large, however, the contrast with ascenders becomes less and legibility actually goes down; as, for example, n and h start to look more alike.

x-height

The height of those lowercase letters such as x , which have no ascenders or descenders.

x-height

The height of those lowercase letters such as x , which do not have ascenders or descenders.

x-height

The height of a lower case letter above the base line (with a flat top like x or z or v as opposed to one with a curved top like o or one with an ascender like l ) . See also Cap-height, Ascender, Descender, Overshoot, Baseline

x-height

The height of the lowercase letters, disregarding ascendersor descenders, typically exemplified by the letter x. The relationship of the x-height to the body defines the perceived type size. A typeface with a large x-height looks much bigger than a typeface with a small x-height at the same size.

x-height

The height of those lowercase letters such as x , which do not have ascenders or descenders. The lowercase x is used for measurement since it usually sits squarely on the baseline.