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vignetting

(1) When unintentional, it is underexposure at the image’s edges or corners caused by an unsuitable lens hood, filter or other attachment that partially blocks the field of view. (2) When intentional, it is an image printing technique where the central area is fully printed but its edges gradually fade. Vignetting can also be achieved when taking the picture by placing a vignette mask in front of the lens.

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vignetting

The term that describes the darkening of the outer edges of the image area due to the use of a filter or add-on lens. Most noticeable when the zoom lens is in full wide-angle. It is also sometimes used as a special effect in the photo editing stage of development.
allthingsphotography

vignetting

fall-off in brightness at the edges of an image, slide, or print. Can be caused by poor lens design, using a lens hood not matched to the lens, or attaching too many filters to the front of the lens.
kodakglosarry1999

vignetting

Darkening of the edges of a photographic image due to the inability of a lens to evenly distribute light to the corners of the frame. While correctable with filtration using on-camera, center-weighted neutral density filters, or electronically in Photoshop, vignetting is often valuable as a creative device to direct the eye back to the center of the frame.
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vignetting

Light rays entering the lens from the edges of the picture area are partially blocked by the lens frames in front of and behind the diaphragm, preventing all the rays from passing through the effective aperture (diaphragm diameter) and causing light fall-off in the peripheral areas of the image. This type of vignetting can be eliminated by stopping down the lens.
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vignetting

Reduced brightness or saturation at edges of image, compared to image s center.
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